OctoPrint Control Box

This box contains a Raspberry Pi running the fabulous OctoPrint / OctoPi, a 5 V power supply and an SSR. It allows you to remotely turn on and off your attached 3D printer, either by using the web interface, by sending G-Code or with a custom system command, which is needed to use the feature through the Telegram plugin. Two hardware buttons are also available to power on/off the printer or send a shutdown command to properly power off the Pi.

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CoreXY Laser Engraver Mk2

Update time! The CoreXY Laser Engraver has been updated with a motorized Z axis and numerous other enhancements… like more laser power. Har Har Har!

When Jogi posted his make on Thingiverse he already added many improvements over my initial design, like cable chains, larger build area and overall cleanliness (I’ll address this one in Mk3 😉 ). We started discussing about a Z axis and it got me hooked up right away. Here’s the result!

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CoreXY Laser Engraver

Lasers are fun, especially high-power ones. Some time ago I purchased a 1 W blue laser and due to a recent 3D printer upgrade I had some spare linear motion components. The next steps are quite obvious, build a 2D laser engraver! I’ve always liked the CoreXY kinematic design and chose to use it in this project.

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Using Rotary Encoders

Many electronics projects need some kind of user input. For those where you need scrolling functionality, in a menu for example, or enter numerical values like a timeout, rotary encoders are very convenient. They are cheap, easy to use and require minimal to none additional components. However, interfacing them requires little more work on the software side than with regular buttons. In this tutorial I present everything needed to use a rotary encoder with a microcontroller. While I used an ATmega uC it should be easily portable to other platforms

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Getting started with Atmel AVRs on Linux

In this small tutorial I will show you how to start programming Atmel microcontrollers under GNU/Linux, Debian in particular. It covers all steps starting with the software prerequisites, setting up a minimal circuit to actually flashing the microcontroller with the obligatory “Hello, World!” program. There are a few stumbling blocks that I hit along the way and I will explicitly point them out and show what to do about them. Hopefully this will save you some frustration.

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